Understanding the Surplus

By Jorge Eduardo García García on January 26, 2017

The main problem arises when a government deficit comes with a primary balance deficit. The primary balance is the difference between government revenue and expenses, without taking into account the cost of the debt (interests).

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Why Didn’t the Depreciation of the Yen Help Exporters?

By Edgar Ortiz on December 13, 2016

Why didn’t the depreciation of the yen help exporters? Primarily, because large exporters are also large importers.

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Trump’s Victory Confirms the Peso’s Weakness

By Edgar Ortiz on December 1, 2016

As long as people are pessimistic about the future of the Mexican economy, the peso will continue to fall. It is still uncertain what Donald Trump’s government can and will do.

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Mexico’s Depreciated Peso and a Formula That Doesn’t Work

By Jorge Eduardo García García on November 21, 2016

Mexico’s position and its depreciated currency is not unique in the world; since 2014 Japan has also lost about 28% of the yen’s value against the dollar and its exports have fallen around 10% since.

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The Strengthening of the Dollar and the Upcoming US elections Mean Tough Times for Mexico

By Edgar Ortiz on November 9, 2016

Since early 2016, producer prices have been growing at increasing rates. High production costs create another obstacle for the struggling industrial sector.

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The Strengthening of the Dollar and the Upcoming US Elections Mean Tough Times for Mexico

By Edgar Ortiz on October 3, 2016

Another measure affecting the industrial sector is the Producer Price Index, which does not bring good news for industries. Since early 2016, producer prices have been growing at increasing rates.

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The Fed’s Policies and their Consequences for Mexico

By Edgar Ortiz on June 16, 2016

The increase in interest rates implemented by the Fed and the resulting outflow of capital from Mexico may begin to affect the good pace in credit growth in the country.

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Slow Growth, High Government Debt

By Edgar Ortiz on June 13, 2016

Mexico continues to experience a yearly growth of less than 3%. Since the second half of 2014, growth rate in Mexico has been stagnant and predictions are that growth will continue at a slow pace throughout this year, as well.

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No End in Sight for Mexico’s Trade Deficit

By Edgar Ortiz on April 4, 2016

The news about the fall in oil prices and the impact it has had on oil producing countries is nothing new. For Mexico, this fall has had a rather notable effect on local currency exchange rates, and in spite of the depreciation of the peso, exportations have not risen.

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Mexico: Petroleum and Public Finance

By Edgar Ortiz on March 10, 2016

Public debt is an increasingly important issue for Mexico. Between January 2014 and December 2015, Mexico’s public debt grew 33%. As Mexico’s debt to GDP reaches 52%, authorities continue to downplay the debt’s importance by pointing out that the debt level is still below that of similar nations. A poor consolation. Below is the debt’s change as percentage of the GDP.

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